All Cornbread is Not Created Equal

BI Holiday Recipe Series

Featured

I grew up eating two types of cornbread: my Granny’s hot water cornbread and Jiffy mix cornbread. Although my Granny’s version was the best served crumbled over a plate of collard greens with hot pepper sauce, I’ve always preferred the sweeter side of things and therefore loved my Jiffy. As an adult, I sought out the best recipes to make a homemade version of Jiffy and found several close contenders – and one box mix that has now replaced Jiffy in my house. For the holidays if you are looking for an undeniably perfect and easy solution to cornbread, try Krusteaz Natural Honey Cornbread mix. You won’t get the 2-for-1 price that Jiffy offers around this time of year, but the results will be worth that extra dime. If you’d rather test your culinary skills this holiday season, try any of the following award-winning cornbread recipes:

From Epicurious:

Sage and Honey Skillet Cornbread

  • 1 cup cornmeal (preferably whole grain, medium grind)
  • 1 cup unbleached all purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage plus 12 whole fresh sage leaves
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter

Preheat oven to 400°F. Heat heavy 10-inch-diameter ovenproof skillet (preferably cast-iron) in oven 10 minutes.

Whisk first 4 ingredients and 2 teaspoons chopped sage in large bowl to blend. Whisk milk, honey, and egg in medium bowl to blend.

Remove skillet from oven; add 1/2 cup butter. Swirl until butter is melted. Pour all except 2 tablespoons butter into egg mixture. Add whole sage leaves to butter in skillet; toss to coat. Arrange leaves over bottom of skillet, spacing apart.

Add egg mixture to cornmeal mixture; stir until just combined (do not overmix; batter will be wet and runny). Pour batter over sage leaves in skillet. Bake until browned around edges and tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 22 minutes. Cool in skillet 10 minutes. Invert onto platter. If necessary, reposition sage leaves atop cornbread.
Read More http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Sage-and-Honey-Skillet-Cornbread-240376#ixzz15v0q35BO

From Allrecipes:

Grandmother’s Buttermilk Cornbread

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2/3 cup white sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease an 8 inch square pan.
  2. Melt butter in large skillet. Remove from heat and stir in sugar. Quickly add eggs and beat until well blended. Combine buttermilk with baking soda and stir into mixture in pan. Stir in cornmeal, flour, and salt until well blended and few lumps remain. Pour batter into the prepared pan.
  3. Bake in the preheated oven for 30 to 40 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

From The Neelys:

Honey Cornbread Muffins

Ingredients

  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/2 stick butter, melted
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • Special equipment: paper muffin cups and a 12-cup muffin tin

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Into a large bowl, mix the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt. In another bowl, whisk together the whole milk, eggs, butter, and honey. Add the wet to the dry ingredients and stir until just mixed.

Place muffin paper liners in a 12-cup muffin tin. Evenly divide the cornbread mixture into the papers. Bake for 15 minutes, until golden.

2 Comments on "All Cornbread is Not Created Equal"

  1. Sean M. Brannon Nov 25, 2010 · 12:04 am

    Damnyankee! That’s Yankee cornbread! No self-respecting person puts sugar in their cornbread. ;-) If you want it sweet, smear something on it.

    I bet you put sugar on your grits, don’t you? Admit it! ;-)

    • kclehman Nov 25, 2010 · 7:36 am

      Sean I am most certainly a self-respecting Yankee, not a Southerner. You can keep that cold, hard bitter cornbread all to yourself. :-)

      My grits I prefer savory.

Comments are now closed for this article.